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2020 Speakers and Sessions

Wednesday, August 19th

Keynote Speaker: Commissioner Jo Ann Hardesty - Social justice and equity in Oregon

11:10-11:40am

Jo Ann is currently a Portland City Commissioner, having taken office on the Portland City Council in January 2019. She oversees Portland Fire & Rescue, Bureau of Emergency Management, Bureau of Emergency Communications, Fire & Police Disability and Retirement Fund, and is committed to building a livable and sustainable city with and for all Portlanders with transparency, accountability and opportunity.

Annual Meeting for ORCHWA Members

12-1:30 pm

More information coming soon


Thursday, August 20th

Session 1 - The Role Traditional Health Workers are playing in Oregon's Health System Transformation

Presentation PDF

11:10-11:40 am Session

11:40-11:55 am Q&A

Abdiasis Mohamed is currently the Program Coordinator for the Traditional Health Worker Program with Oregon Health Authority’s Office of Equity and Inclusion. With Office of Equity and Inclusion, Mohamed is charged with developing and implementing strategic work plan to support a sustainable and effective traditional Health Worker program, Traditional health worker Workforce, Training programs, State run website registry and its integration into Oregon’s health system transformation. He also oversees the Traditional health worker commission and its subcommittees and ensures that the Commission meets its goals, deliverables and timelines. Mohamed serves on numerous advisory boards, committees and councils that influence both social and policy change at a local level, and statewide.

Abstract: The utilization of Traditional Health Workers (THWs) in Oregon has assured the healthcare system in Oregon a delivery of high-quality, culturally competent care which is instrumental in achieving Oregon's Triple Aim of Better Health, Better Care and Lower Cost. THWs provide critical services in outreaching and mobilizing patients, community and cultural liaison, managing and coordinating care, assisting in system navigation, and health promotion and coaching.

Key focal areas for THWs in Oregon’s health transformation include pursuing strategies to integrate THWs into the CCOs, advancing community engagement opportunities, and developing and implementing ongoing revisions to the THW scope in the context of health system transformation. These targeted areas require engagement of CCOs, Health Systems to utilize THWs in community settings, and increase the percentage of CCOs and their providers to employ THWs to the extent needed within a community.


Breakout Session 2 - Weight Bias and Health Equity

Presentation PDF

12:00-12:30 pm Session

12:30-12:45 pm Q&A

Sossity Chiricuzio (she/her) has been doing Community Health work for decades in the queer/trans, disabled, and fat communities, educating and advocating for herself and others in healthcare, social services, and shared community spaces.

She comes from a long line of women who have supported the work of healthcare while questioning and addressing the shortcomings of the healthcare system, and is currently the Communications and Membership Manager at ORCHWA.

Alix Sanchez (they/them) has built their career supporting culturally-specific and equity-focused approaches in the fields of child welfare, early childhood education, domestic violence, and health promotion. They are the former Executive Director of the Oregon Community Health Workers Association, and currently manage the Multnomah County Domestic and Sexual Violence Coordination Office.

Abstract: Using popular education methodology, and a presentation of historical and current data (which will be available as a printable download to all participants), we will examine the ways that weight bias impedes both health equity and personal health. CHWs will build skills and learn tools for addressing weight bias with the communities we serve and the health care systems we engage with.



Breakout Session 3 - Learned Helplessness, Person-Centered Services, and Disability Rights in Oregon

Presentation PDF

1:00am-1:30 pm Session

1:30-1:45 pm Q&A

Yetu Dumbia is the Developmental Disability/Mental Health and Traditional Health Worker Program Coordinator for The Oregon Home Care Commission (OHCC). Prior to OHCC, she was a Victim Advocate for Lutheran Community Services Northwest, and Program manager at the Immigrant Refugees Community Organization (IRCO). She is currently serving as the Traditional Health Worker Commissioner Chair with OEI. Yetu has a background in elementary education, nursing and is a certified life coach. She is passionate about health equity and justice. She has thought many cross cultural and trauma informed care trainings in the metro area. Yetu is a Community Health Worker who is passionate about empowering underserved communities.

Cheryl Miller has been the Executive Director of the Oregon Home Care Commission for thirteen years, she is a champion for older adults and people across the life span experiencing disabilities. She is a supporter of the homecare and personal support worker workforce. Cheryl along with the Oregon Home Care Commission’s Commissioners have worked collaboratively with stakeholders and partners statewide to ensure that Oregonians seeking in-home services have access to a trained qualified diverse workforce. Cheryl has a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with an emphasis in Marketing from San Diego State University in San Diego, California. She is a native Californian, but she has lived in the Pacific Northwest for nearly 19 years.

Patrick Van Orden is a program analyst for the Oregon Home Care Commission. He completed a Ph.D. in political science at the University of Oregon in 2018. He also served in the U.S. Army from 2007 to 2010. Patrick’s research interests include emotion’s role in decision-making and he is passionate about improving public service.

Abstract: We will discuss how norms of care have changed for individuals that experience disabilities in Oregon. Our current era emphasizes providing ‘person-centered’ services. Services that are person-centered allow for the individual that receive services to direct their care; this was not always the case. We will discuss how services are delivered in Oregon and how that relates to the concept of learned helplessness and person-centered services. We are aiming to have at least one consumer that receives services discuss how person-centered services relates to their care as a panelist.





Friday, August 21st

Breakout Session 4 - Person-Centered Leadership

11:10-11:40 am Session

11:40-11:55 am Q&A

Yetu Dumbia is the Developmental Disability/Mental Health and Traditional Health Worker Program Coordinator for The Oregon Home Care Commission (OHCC). Prior to OHCC, she was a Victim Advocate for Lutheran Community Services Northwest, and Program manager at the Immigrant Refugees Community Organization (IRCO). She is currently serving as the Traditional Health Worker Commissioner Chair with OEI. Yetu has a background in elementary education, nursing and is a certified life coach. She is passionate about health equity and justice. She has thought many cross cultural and trauma informed care trainings in the metro area. Yetu is a Community Health Worker who is passionate about empowering underserved communities.

Cheryl Miller has been the Executive Director of the Oregon Home Care Commission for thirteen years, she is a champion for older adults and people across the life span experiencing disabilities. She is a supporter of the homecare and personal support worker workforce. Cheryl along with the Oregon Home Care Commission’s Commissioners have worked collaboratively with stakeholders and partners statewide to ensure that Oregonians seeking in-home services have access to a trained qualified diverse workforce. Cheryl has a Bachelor of Science in Business Administration with an emphasis in Marketing from San Diego State University in San Diego, California. She is a native Californian, but she has lived in the Pacific Northwest for nearly 19 years.

Patrick Van Orden is a program analyst for the Oregon Home Care Commission. He completed a Ph.D. in political science at the University of Oregon in 2018. He also served in the U.S. Army from 2007 to 2010. Patrick’s research interests include emotion’s role in decision-making and he is passionate about improving public service. He lives with his partner in Corvallis, Oregon

Abstract: Facilitate discussion on leadership. We are all leaders-ask the group what comes up when they hear leader. Facilitate discussion on different styles of leadership Add styles of leadership. Have each group act out one of the four leadership stylea. Have each group report out after the act centered leadership approach. Scenarios: LGBTQQIA2S+, Immigrant & Refugees, People with Disabilities,Older adults, People experiencing homelessness, Native American . Group size 3-4 participants. Discuss one scenario per group and then review.




Breakout Session 5 - Strengthening CHWs Oregon Movement: Challenging Politics of Equity

Presentation PDF

12:00-12:30 pm Session

12:30-12:45 pm Q&A

Sandra Hernandes, Ph.D., M.Ed., Doula, Psychologist, Theatre of the Oppresed (TO) Director and Popular Educator. Director and co-founder of Doulas Latin@s International and of Spect-Actors Collective, Sandra has implemented TO Forum Theatre nationally and internationally and facilitates trainings on interesectionality of equity, immigration, race, gender, class and issues of economic, health and social justice.

She trains doulas and teaches Emotional Intelligence, Popular Education, Personality Development, and Cultural Competence. She is THW/TEMPS Sub Committee member.

Dona Toña Sanchez, CHW, Popular Educator. Toña received the APHA THW of 2015 award. She teaches medicinal herbs, nutrition, breast cancer, community garden. Family mentor of Columbia Gorge/OR and Mexico for 35 years. She has co-presented at the Theatre of the Oppressed plays since 2010 with Sandra Hernandes and Spect-Actors Collective.

She is co-founder and board member of Doulas Latin@s International and ORCHWA. She has served 6 years at the THW Commission.

Abstract: This workshop is experiential and thought provoking to challenge everyone’s to critical thinking about the current process of social movement building in Oregon, nationwide and internationally such as Immigration, Health Care, and Criminal Justice. Participants will be guided to experience situations to help surface perceptions or deep insights about their relation to such movements. They will “Learn to Question” about their beliefs and behavior about their own social class and trust their insights and critical thinking capacity to engage and commit with social movements. Using theatrical games and the Circle of Culture Freire’s method we will create a friendly atmosphere to support everyone to experience the challenges to embrace praxis - action and reflection – beyond the general activism and or verbalism.




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